Three Questions to Ask About Your Digital Signage Content

By Frank Kenna
President and CEO, The Marlin Company

Frank_Kenna_11-17-2014I write a lot about digital signage content because that’s what digital signage is all about — getting the right content in front of your employees. Here are three high-level questions to help you figure out how good your content is (or isn’t).

1. How relevant is the content to your objectives? Many digital signage administrators starting out use lots of “eye candy,” that free or low-cost content floating around on the Internet. Sure it looks nice, but does it actually help you communicate your objectives? No. What it does do is help drive readership (see point #3), but that should only be one ingredient for effective digital signage. Your issues and objectives should directly drive most of your content.

2. How easily can you create and display the content? Once you’ve identified what your important objectives are, who’s going to develop the content? Someone needs to own it to make sure there’s fresh, relevant material on a regular basis. These admins need software that’s easy to use and lets them post content quickly. Or they can access turnkey but issue-related content.

3. Will people actually read it? If they don’t, what’s the point? For example, posting an Excel spreadsheet with dozens of rows and columns won’t cut it. You need to pick an important piece of data and focus on that, perhaps by creating a chart illustrating the point. Make it applicable to their jobs: If they’re on the factory floor, show them production metrics, not sales or profit numbers. And at least 25 percent of your content should be non-business stuff, such as news, sports, weather and trivia.

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Answering these three questions will get you well on the way to an effective digital signage system that really works. Whether you’re searching for digital signage or already have a system installed, a little thought about content creation goes a long way.

This column was reprinted with permission from the Digital Screenmedia Association and originally appeared here.